Wonder
Hole 3: The Castle
Par 3, 194 Yards

Hole 3: The Castle

Par 3, 194 Yards
If you need a break, enter the gothic-arch doorway; inside is a stone staircase to the left and the “murdering hole” overhead – intruders were greeted by boiling water, stones and other missiles from the above.

Hardly visible is part of a deep ditch – the oldest preserved feature of the course – which once encircled a promontory fort in the Bronze Age, long before the castle was built.

Playing Tips

The show-piece of the course – a slender finger of green rising from the crashing waves – requires no more than an eight or nine iron, but the rocks and hungry sea at the right have claimed many a ball. It is hard not to be distracted by the 14th century castle/tower, with the backdrop of Fenit Island and the sweeping panorama of mountains and Tralee Bay.

  • 194 Yards
  • 158 Yards
  • 145 Yards
  • 124 Yards
Wonder
Hole 6: Chough’s corner
Par 4, 427 Yards

Hole 6: Chough’s corner

Par 4, 427 Yards
So-called because of the red-legged choughs that congregate here. The Sliabh Mish mountains are facing you as you head towards the green. Large chunks have been hewn out of them by aeons of streams, rivers and waterfalls; they are of Old Red Sandstone, of the Palaeolithic age, which gives them another-worldly appearance at different times of the day.
Playing Tips

The 6th is a sharp right dog-leg par 4, the second part over undulating hillocks as you go towards the green, this is the beginning of the Loop, comprising the 6th, 7th and 8th, and noted as Arnold Palmer’s favourite part of the course. The second shot must allow for a slopping green right to left with a deep bunker over the back left.

  • 427 Yards
  • 421 Yards
  • 390 Yards
  • 399 Yards
Wonder
Hole 7: The Randy
Par 3, 157 Yards

Hole 7: The Randy

Par 3, 157 Yards
The “Randy”, a colloquial word from “Rendezvous”, was a haven for smugglers in times past. There are accounts of tobacco, silks and other luxuries being brought in at night to be distributed to the “Big House”, with lights signalling the arrival of the boats.
Playing Tips

At this short par 3 the tee-boxes overlook the Randy Quay. This hole has a narrow, three-tiered green with pot bunkers for protection. Clubbing is crucial here as a ball on the wrong level will leave a devilish putt.

  • 157 Yards
  • 148 Yards
  • 126 Yards
  • 124 Yards
Wonder
Hole 8: The Creek
Par 4, 399 Yards

Hole 8: The Creek

Par 4, 399 Yards

The “Creek of Barrow” is the channel that runs in from the ocean to Barrow Harbour (one of the most important places in Europe for bird-watching and officially designated an Environmentally Sensitive Area in 1995).

You might see one or two of the 6 Grey Herons who come back each year to the tall trees near Barrow House.

Playing Tips

This is a classic par 4. You might be tempted to go with a driver, then hopefully leaving no more than a pitch to the green. But the rocks and the Atlantic lie in wait to the left for the even-slightly pulled shot. The approach should be played slightly to the right as the ball will kick left onto the green. Putting here is an experience.

  • 399 Yards
  • 391 Yards
  • 359 Yards
  • 300 Yards
Wonder
Hole 9: Hare’s Lane
Par 5, 504 Yards

Hole 9: Hare’s Lane

Par 5, 504 Yards

You might find yourself trying to outdo a hare or two, whose haunts are hereabouts.

You are now ready for some sustenance at the Clubhouse pit-stop, before the next 9-hole adventure - the “best you’ll ever find” according to Chris Falkenhagen of the Maryland Independent.

Playing Tips

After the tussle with the Loop, this slightly uphill par 5 should be a clear run and can be reached in two. There is plenty of fairway with only the bunkers on the right to hinder progress.

  • 504 Yards
  • 495 Yards
  • 462 Yards
  • 446 Yards
Wonder
Hole 13: Brock’s Hollow
Par 3, 159 Yards

Hole 13: Brock’s Hollow

Par 3, 159 Yards

History doesn’t tell who or what “Brock” was although, it is a local name for Badger.

A short iron should do it here. But it’s hard not to look down and wonder how you can recover an errant ball from this Irish Grand Canyon. The caddie of course. Enough to know that this is a “dinky” par 3. Just don’t look down.

Playing Tips

An intimidating Par 3 from the tee, as the ball must carry all the way. The shot is also slightly uphill, so take the right club. A shot slightly overhit into the sand dune behind can sometimes come back down onto the green, but if it catches up the back it can leave a very awkward chip.

  • 159 Yards
  • 152 Yards
  • 130 Yards
  • 103 Yards
Wonder
Hole 14: Crosty
Par 4, 403 Yards

Hole 14: Crosty

Par 4, 403 Yards

Mighty Crosty is facing you here, but this rocky outcrop is on another patch of land in the distance. It overlooks a place called Sandy Lane one side and Carrahane Strand on the other.

The latter is the stretch of beach and sandhills near Banna Strand where Sir Roger Casement came ashore from a German submarine in 1916. It was a prelude to the unsuccessful Easter Rising.

Playing Tips

From this elevated tee the fairway beckons. Hit straight and you’re laughing. A good drive down either of the two parallel fairways will be rewarded with a short iron approach to the green. Avoid the deep bunkers tucked into the mounds

  • 403 Yards
  • 397 Yards
  • 388 Yards
  • 282 Yards
Wonder
Hole 15: Poulgorm
Par 4, 300 Yards

Hole 15: Poulgorm

Par 4, 300 Yards

The ‘Blue Hole’ where the Atlantic comes in and stays.

The tee-box looks down on this deceptively tranquil inlet, where a little further on is “Poul Paddy” where three Paddy’s lost their lives.

Playing Tips

The course’s shortest par 4. Your short tee-shot should take you to the main fairway plateau. The marram grass after that is bountiful, but a short left through the gap should put you on the green.

  • 300 Yards
  • 293 Yards
  • 267 Yards
  • 233 Yards
Wonder
Hole 16: Shipwreck
Par 3, 199 Yards

Hole 16: Shipwreck

Par 3, 199 Yards
The many rocks helped to destroy several ships in this dangerous stretch of ocean. Along with cargo vessels, such as the “Port Stanley”, “Catherine Richards” and “Wild Trader”, a vessel of the Spanish Armada (1588) came aground here, with terrible consequences for her crew – all hanged on order of Sir Edward Denny who owned Tralee town and its castle, the latter demolished in 1826.
Playing Tips

An exciting par 3, this glorious one-shotter is described as the best of the par threes. The target is small but help is at hand – a shot hitting the bank on the left will generally feed down onto this green. The elevated tee overlooks part of a coast described as “the graveyard of the Spanish Armada”.

  • 199 Yards
  • 179 Yards
  • 138 Yards
  • 119 Yards